Disrupt Africa https://disrupt-africa.com Startup | Invest | Disrupt Wed, 25 Nov 2020 18:46:16 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 Egyptian fantasy sports startup Eksab raises $500k funding https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/egyptian-fantasy-sports-startup-eksab-raises-500k-funding/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=egyptian-fantasy-sports-startup-eksab-raises-500k-funding Thu, 26 Nov 2020 09:00:17 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23982 Egyptian startup Eksab, a daily fantasy sports platform, has raised US$500,000 in funding to help it reach more football fans across the Middle East and Africa. Eksab is looking to tap into the MENA region’s love for football by providing users with exciting and engaging mobile games. Users download the app, make predictions about live [...]

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Egyptian startup Eksab, a daily fantasy sports platform, has raised US$500,000 in funding to help it reach more football fans across the Middle East and Africa.

Eksab is looking to tap into the MENA region’s love for football by providing users with exciting and engaging mobile games. Users download the app, make predictions about live football games from around the world, collect points based on the accuracy of their predictions, and get rewarded with prizes.

The startup, which raised a round of seed funding from 500 Startups in June 2019, has announced an investment of US$500,000 from 4DX Ventures as well as other strategic investors within the international sports and entertainment ecosystem. 

With the investment, Eksab plans to scale its product to the millions of football fans in the region with the goal of launching its first paid competitions over the next year. 

“Daily Fantasy Sports and monetised competitions are a multi-billion dollar a year industry in the US,” said Eksab co-founder and chief executive officer (CEO) Aly Mahmoud. “Our goal is to become the premier sports entertainment company in the MEA region by offering exciting fantasy sports competitions as well as highly engaging local sports content.” 

Peter Orth, partner at 4DX, said he saw the region as one of the most exciting and underserved markets for a sports entertainment platform. 

“We’ve been really impressed with Aly’s vision for a next-generation and technology-driven platform that is also highly tailored to local fans and their preferences. We’re excited to be on this journey with Aly and the rest of the Eksab team,” he said.

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Kenya’s Motoqaa launches lease-to-own vehicles marketplace https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/kenyas-motoqaa-launches-lease-to-own-vehicles-marketplace/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kenyas-motoqaa-launches-lease-to-own-vehicles-marketplace Thu, 26 Nov 2020 08:00:57 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23966 Kenyan startup Motoqaa has launched a digital lease-to-own vehicle marketplace that helps drivers acquire vehicles over time. Rolled out in June, Motoqaa provides managed services for peer-to-peer lease-to-own contracts for vehicles in the taxi-hailing business.  “We source for drivers, collect payments and manage operations necessary to keep the vehicles and drivers on the road,” Mugambi [...]

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Kenyan startup Motoqaa has launched a digital lease-to-own vehicle marketplace that helps drivers acquire vehicles over time.

Rolled out in June, Motoqaa provides managed services for peer-to-peer lease-to-own contracts for vehicles in the taxi-hailing business. 

“We source for drivers, collect payments and manage operations necessary to keep the vehicles and drivers on the road,” Mugambi Munyua, the startup’s founder, told Disrupt Africa.

The startup, which manages a fleet of 28 vehicles, may be relatively new, but Munyua and co-founder Olivia Gachoya started working on the idea in April 2019, and have been in the taxi business since 2016. 

“We have advanced our operations by building in-house technology to implement pay-as-you-go models for vehicles using devices that can immobilise or mobilise the vehicle based on the status of payment,” Munyua said.

Motoqaa believes that supporting car ownership will make participation in the ride-hailing economy more profitable for drivers, while also helping its finance partners make returns.

“Drivers would rather have the option to own the vehicles they use in the business. They are however locked out of the formal credit system. Partners are looking to build wealth or earn an extra income. They seek a return of capital and additional profit,” he said.

“Both the drivers and partners are seeking to acquire wealth in different forms. Drivers are looking to acquire an asset and partners are looking at return on investment.”

Motoqaa puts itself at the centre of this, sourcing for drivers with a high probability of completing a contract, and then managing payment collection, aided by technology. Self-funded thus far, the startup is targeting a seed round in mid-2021 as it plans to pivot its business model.

“We would like to transition from a peer-to-peer model to a securitised asset financing model. This will allow us to scale faster and be more impactful to the community of drivers. The move will also see us earn revenue from marking up the vehicles ourselves,” said Munyua.

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5 top tips for angel investing in African tech startups https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/5-top-tips-for-angel-investing-in-african-tech-startups/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-top-tips-for-angel-investing-in-african-tech-startups Thu, 26 Nov 2020 06:00:07 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23971 Zachariah George is the wearer of many hats – co-founder of the Startupbootcamp AfriTech accelerator, principal at Nedbank Venture Capital, and active angel investor. As an angel, George is especially busy. He has made around 50 angel investments since moving to South Africa in 2010, initially all in the financial services space. After building Startupbootcamp [...]

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Zachariah George is the wearer of many hats – co-founder of the Startupbootcamp AfriTech accelerator, principal at Nedbank Venture Capital, and active angel investor.

As an angel, George is especially busy. He has made around 50 angel investments since moving to South Africa in 2010, initially all in the financial services space. After building Startupbootcamp AfriTech he saw the need for innovation in other spaces, and started making investments elsewhere too.

Speaking on the latest edition of Disrupt Podcast, George shared a few key tips for high net worth individuals interested in getting involved in angel investing in African tech.

Stick to your lane

At the beginning, investors should stick to the geography – and indeed the vertical – that they are familiar with.

“If you are a first time angel investor, or have been investing for less than a year or two years, I would really suggest that you stick to your local or regional geography where you can add a lot of value beyond just money. Contrary to popular belief angel investing is more about networks and resources, intellectual value add and value add from a supply and distribution standpoint than just money,” George said.

Be patient

You may be keen to build a portfolio as quickly as possible, but it makes more sense to take your time.

“Do not invest all your money at one single point in time. Just because you’ve had a windfall of let’s say US$100,000, don’t just dump it into five companies, US$20,000 each. You want to tranche your investments over a period of time because you want to account for market cyclicality,” said George. 

“I would strongly suggest angels look at disbursing capital over a one year period, and stick to about two or three investments a year if this is your first rodeo, and try and limit your total exposure to angel investments to nothing more than 20 per cent of your net worth. Twenty per cent is a high watermark.”

Syndicates make due diligence easier

There are many differences between VC and angel investing, with the latter about taking educated bets on mostly pre-revenue businesses. Conducting due diligence can be challenging.

“Angel investing diligence is much less structured than VC diligence, which can take months. The four components are financial diligence, operational diligence, technical diligence and legal diligence. That’s why they take so long. And most VCs will outsource one or more of those to third party firms,” George said. 

“Angels don’t have the time for that. They have a one or two hour call with the founding team. And the questions they need to be asking are – how big is this market? What are the average margins? Who are your biggest competitors? And angels get a lot of that done by investing in syndicates. I would suggest being part of a group where you have people with varying expertise.”

Add value to your portfolio, but don’t let startups become dependent

As mentioned above, angels bring a lot more to the table for an early-stage startup than simp;y cash, and ensuring you have the ability to offer active support to entrepreneurs is another reason why you should tranche your investments. Yet you want to avoid a situation where a startup becomes dependent on your help.

“As an angel the most value that you add to a company is the first year or 18 months after investing in them. You add all your networks, the corporate connections you have, the investors you know. A company I invested in five years ago, I may have at best an hour chat with the founders every three months. One that I invested in two months ago I’m talking to more often,” said George.

“Never get into a situation as an angel investor where you allow your portfolio companies to become dependent on you. There are advisors for that, and advisors get paid, or they get paid in equity. As an angel investor you want to open doors to founders as quickly as you can and then sit back and help when you can, not at the beckon call of the founder.”

Know when/how to get out

There are two ways an angel can make a return on an investment. VC kicks in at seed or, more likely, Series A level, where minimum cheque sizes are larger and startups have met certain KPIs. At this point an angel investor will be given the opportunity to get out.

“You literally add almost no value to a company and are just sitting on a cap table and making matters more complicated. A lot of very prominent African tech ventures end up having 25-30 people on their cap table at Series A or Series B, so what ends up happening is that incoming lead investors will offer X to buy out these angels, and do a secondary sale in addition to putting in money,” said George.

More patient angels could be prepared to sit it out and wait for an acquisition or (far less likely) an IPO.

“There are some angels that don’t need to get out, and they can wait seven to 10 years for a liquidity event,” said George.

The latest episode of Disrupt Podcast is available now, featuring in-depth interviews with George as well as Antoine Paillusseau of South African AI startup FinChatBot

You can listen on Soundcloud, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and all other podcasting platforms.

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Foundation Ventures launches debut Egypt-focused fund with 4 investments https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/foundation-ventures-launches-debut-egypt-focused-fund-with-4-investments/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=foundation-ventures-launches-debut-egypt-focused-fund-with-4-investments Wed, 25 Nov 2020 09:00:19 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23953 Foundation Ventures, a regional venture capital firm founded at the start of 2019, has announced the close of its first Egypt-focused fund, with four investments made so far. Managed by Mazen Nadim, Omar Barakat, and Ziyad Hamdy, in partnership with HOF Capital, a US based VC firm, and BPE Partners, Foundation Ventures backs best-in-class founders [...]

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Foundation Ventures, a regional venture capital firm founded at the start of 2019, has announced the close of its first Egypt-focused fund, with four investments made so far.

Managed by Mazen Nadim, Omar Barakat, and Ziyad Hamdy, in partnership with HOF Capital, a US based VC firm, and BPE Partners, Foundation Ventures backs best-in-class founders building high-impact new technology companies. 

Aside from providing capital, the firm works closely with the founders to help them grow their businesses. Its first fund is focused on early-stage investments ranging from pre-seed to Series A, with the fund backed by some of the largest family offices and business leaders from Egypt and the MENA region. 

The announcement of the fund comes with Foundation Ventures also revealing it has invested in four Egyptian startups, three of whom it names. Its portfolio includes B2B marketplace Capiter, employee wellness platform NowPay, and Minly, which helps connect celebrities with their fans. The fourth, unnamed, startup is in the logistics space.

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Zimbabwean startup Wellnescript launches employee wellness marketplace https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/zimbabwean-startup-wellnescript-launches-employee-wellness-marketplace/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=zimbabwean-startup-wellnescript-launches-employee-wellness-marketplace Wed, 25 Nov 2020 08:00:54 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23809 Zimbabwean startup Wellnescript has launched an online marketplace through which employers can purchase wellness video modules for their employees. Formed in 2019 as a spinout from a digital platform for diabetes and hypertension, Wellnescript lists video modules from independent domain experts on the eight dimensions of wellness, and companies buy access for their employees. The [...]

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Zimbabwean startup Wellnescript has launched an online marketplace through which employers can purchase wellness video modules for their employees.

Formed in 2019 as a spinout from a digital platform for diabetes and hypertension, Wellnescript lists video modules from independent domain experts on the eight dimensions of wellness, and companies buy access for their employees.

The startup, which launched its platform in September, offers both free and paid packages, with modules covering topics from employee physical and mental health to financial literacy and career growth. It also provides office and home based blood testing and wellness checks.

“Employees also use the platform to track their physical and mental health and can request one-on-one wellness coaching from qualified health professionals. Services are personalised through algorithms. In the future we also want to facilitate personalised wellness physical products like wellness foods,” said Reggie Mutetwa, Wellnescript’s founder and chief executive officer (CEO).

Mutetwa said companies and employees in Africa lack platforms where they can access wellness and life success training on demand. 

“In addition, health and wellness services lack personalisation, leading to low participation by employees, while independent experts lack a platform where they can sell their knowledge and services to companies and employees,” he said.

The self-funded Wellnescript is filling that gap, and after only a few weeks of operation already has seven companies signed up with a combined employee base of more than 700 employees.

“We are operating in the South African and Zimbabwean market, but we have also started campaigns in the rest of English-speaking Africa,” Mutetwa said.

The startup, which makes money by charging a commission on sales made through its platform, is for now focused on growth over monetisation, he said.

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Serial SA entrepreneur back with new solution to help companies work remotely https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/serial-sa-entrepreneur-back-with-new-solution-to-help-companies-work-remotely/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=serial-sa-entrepreneur-back-with-new-solution-to-help-companies-work-remotely Wed, 25 Nov 2020 06:00:20 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23901 Carl Wallace has been around the block of South Africa’s startup world a time or two, founding a bunch of companies and raising several funding rounds. Now, he’s back with a tool that will help companies work better remotely, and he’s funding it himself. A quick look at Wallace’s LinkedIn gives you a snapshot of [...]

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Carl Wallace has been around the block of South Africa’s startup world a time or two, founding a bunch of companies and raising several funding rounds. Now, he’s back with a tool that will help companies work better remotely, and he’s funding it himself.

A quick look at Wallace’s LinkedIn gives you a snapshot of his activity over the last few years. He began entrepreneurial life as founder of website-builder ViGO, which is now part of his marketing company Digital Drawing Room.

Digital Drawing Room is itself part of Digital HQ, of which Wallace is group chief executive officer (CEO). The group also comprises Wapp and Digemy, and the newest addition is ydox, a communication, collaboration and content management tool that enables business teams to work more efficiently, securely and remotely. 

“We built this solution to solve business critical problems caused by cyber security threats, email communication and the way we work with digital content,” Wallace told Disrupt Africa.

Wallace, who has been working on ydox for the last three years, said the platform is more than just a tech solution. 

“I want to completely change the way business teams are working, for two reasons. One, a more efficient and safer way to manage content and communicate with clients where critical company information is at stake in a massive attempt to get rid of the huge cyber risk around email, and two, to drastically decrease the amount of digital waste that is created so as to bring down our contribution to damage caused to global environment,” he said.

Cyber security, specifically around email communication and company content that gets sent all over the internet, is a major threat to all businesses, says Wallace. 

“Email security has become so insanely tight in order to try and solve this problem, soon we won’t be able to send and receive. A change in the way we work with content and communication around business files is much needed,” he said.

With the global shift towards remote working of late, the timing for a new way of working could not be better. 

“Due to the way we currently work with digital files, we create such a vast amount of redundant, useless data, that the majority of the cloud infrastructure exists to store data that will never be seen again,” said Wallace.

“The world’s data industry that houses enormous quantities of information created by our daily work and personal activities – consume about three percent of the global electricity supply, and produce two per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions – roughly the same as global air travel. This needs to change and we have started by empowering teams to be more efficient.”

ydox has already rolled out to small and medium sized businesses over multiple industries, including legal, financial, professional services, medical and retail. With its latest version, it is moving into the corporate space with an enterprise-ready solution for large teams.

“We are primarily focused on the South African market, but have started rolling out in Europe – England, Switzerland and the Netherlands to be specific,” Wallace said. “There is so much space for us in Africa, so we will be busy on the continent for a very long time. As worldwide expansion increases we will set up teams around the world to support the growth.”

Having been through various capital raises in the past, Wallace has departed from his usual methods by self-funding ydox himself thus far.

“I took a new strategy for this one by putting my own money where my mouth is and proving to the world that I back myself. Once we are ready for mass global scaling, I might consider doing a round for that,” he said.

The startup, which as a SaaS product charges customers a monthly subscription fee per employee, may not be funded, but it does have a significant advantage in being part of the Digital HQ group of companies.

“The benefit of ydox being a part of Digital HQ is that all support, design and software development needs are catered for by Digital Drawing Room and Wapp respectively. The rollout and support model is based on software reselling and implementing firms that make our technology available to their existing client base,” said Wallace.

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Egyptian e-commerce startup ExpandCart raises $2.5m Series A funding round https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/egyptian-e-commerce-startup-expandcart-raises-2-5m-series-a-funding-round/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=egyptian-e-commerce-startup-expandcart-raises-2-5m-series-a-funding-round Tue, 24 Nov 2020 09:00:24 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23963 Egyptian startup ExpandCart, an e-commerce and retail platform, has secured US$2.5 million in Series A funding to help it continue to grow. Used by more than 20,000 merchants in over 40 countries, ExpandCart provides comprehensive eCommerce solutions to enable merchants and retailers to build their online stores and expand their sales.  The startup’s omni-channel selling [...]

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Egyptian startup ExpandCart, an e-commerce and retail platform, has secured US$2.5 million in Series A funding to help it continue to grow.

Used by more than 20,000 merchants in over 40 countries, ExpandCart provides comprehensive eCommerce solutions to enable merchants and retailers to build their online stores and expand their sales. 

The startup’s omni-channel selling solution includes a feature-rich and customisable platform for building online storefronts, an integrated cloud point-of-sale system for retailers, and a connected branded merchant mobile app.

ExpandCart’s Series A round was led by Sawari Ventures with the participation of Agility Ventures, Graphene Ventures, and two angel investors. The investment comes as part of the company’s strategic plan to focus on digital commerce solutions that target online and offline retailers and reduce the gap between suppliers and merchants in the Middle East.

“At ExpandCart, we believe that technology can empower commerce, with that vision in mind, over the past couple of years, we have built solutions to help merchants expand their sales online and offline. This new round of funding will help us implement our ambitious roadmap of new innovative e-commerce solutions that will supercharge e-commerce growth in the Middle East,” said Amr Shawqy, chief executive officer (CEO) and co-founder of ExpandCart.

Ahmed El Alfi, chairman of Sawari Ventures, said the ExpandCart team had built an amazing platform supporting thousands of merchants from all over the Middle East. 

“Their new e-commerce solutions roadmap proves that they truly understand the future of e-commerce, and we are excited to become part of their journey,” he said.

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2nd Venture for Africa cohort to connect talent to fast-growing African startups https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/2nd-venture-for-africa-cohort-to-connect-talent-to-fast-growing-african-startups/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2nd-venture-for-africa-cohort-to-connect-talent-to-fast-growing-african-startups Tue, 24 Nov 2020 07:00:11 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23950 Applications for the second Venture for Africa cohort are now open, helping to connect top local and global talent with fast-growing African tech startups. Disrupt Africa reported in May on the launch of Venture for Africa, which aims to fill talent gaps at African startups via a three-month immersive fellowship programme. After a successful inaugural [...]

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Applications for the second Venture for Africa cohort are now open, helping to connect top local and global talent with fast-growing African tech startups.

Disrupt Africa reported in May on the launch of Venture for Africa, which aims to fill talent gaps at African startups via a three-month immersive fellowship programme.

After a successful inaugural remote fellowship cohort, applications are now open for the second cohort, scheduled to launch in January 2021. Roles are open to professionals across Africa, and globally, in product management, marketing and growth, who are interested in gaining experience with startups in Africa. 

Participating companies for this cohort include Sokowatch, Carbon, Turaco and Victory Farms, with more partners to be announced in the coming weeks. The inaugural programme saw more than 300 applications from over 30 countries, for five open roles. All fellows in the inaugural cohort remained in the startup ecosystem – three were offered longer term roles at their hosting startups, and others started consultancies and joined venture-building teams.

“We saw incredible success with our first cohort, as each fellow came onboard with unique experience, strong drive and an ability to hit the ground running at their assigned startups,” said Venture for Africa co-founder, Tobi Lafinhan. 

“We were impressed with the diversity of experience we saw – from Olivia, who spent 20+ years in Kenya’s advertising industry, to Wanjiku who brought deep experience in analytics from her time in South Africa. We are extremely excited to kick off the search for our next cohort and look forward to meeting more quality talent that can contribute to our partners.”

Applications are open here.

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COVID-19 gives African ed-tech a shot in the arm, but more needs to be done https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/covid-19-gives-african-ed-tech-a-shot-in-the-arm-but-more-needs-to-be-done/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=covid-19-gives-african-ed-tech-a-shot-in-the-arm-but-more-needs-to-be-done Tue, 24 Nov 2020 06:00:35 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23948 As with the African e-health space, ed-tech on the continent has received a bit of a boost from the lockdowns enforced by the COVID-19 pandemic. A database published by the EdTech Hub back in May demonstrated that use of ed-tech products serving African countries doubled over the course of the previous month, as schools across [...]

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As with the African e-health space, ed-tech on the continent has received a bit of a boost from the lockdowns enforced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

A database published by the EdTech Hub back in May demonstrated that use of ed-tech products serving African countries doubled over the course of the previous month, as schools across the continent closed their doors.

With the average number of child users of ed-tech users increasing by 97 per cent since in the wake of school closures, ed-tech startups received a welcome boost. Wesley Lynch, chief executive officer (CEO) of South African e-textbooks provider Snapplify, testifies to the speedy growth.

“We saw many new first time users. Some people on the fence have adopted e-learning for next year as the norm,” he said. “There is more support for teachers, and acceleration into technology investment.”

It is not just content where uptake has been seen, however. Bola Lawal runs ScholarX, a Nigerian scholarship management platform, and he says interest in ed-tech in general has been spurred by COVID-19 and the changes it wrought.

“Remote learning has created new opportunities and investments from the public sector. Governments are funding initiatives to help the masses access learning, and this has created new opportunities,” he said.

This sudden uptake is more than welcome, says Doug Hoernle, a veteran of the ed-tech space and CEO of South African school payments app Karri.

“It’s been a tough run, but the upheaval within the ed-tech space has been fantastic. There’s been an inevitable shift to a digital world, be it how we buy our groceries or how we pay our child’s school fees,” he said. 

“Simple normalities of life pre-COVID simply do not exist anymore – adapting to a new normal, albeit stressful and full of unknowns, is refreshing and I think a good step in the right direction when it comes to technology.”

The ed-tech space had been generally growing before the pandemic, yet the shot in the arm occasioned by COVID-19 is undeniable. Gabriel Ekman is managing director of Rwanda’s BAG Innovation, which helps connect university students with work experience. He said the Rwandan ed-tech scene has been booming, as it is elsewhere.

“The COVID-19 crisis has been an eye-opener for many schools to modernise their approach to learning and I believe that the traditional academic system will be completely transformed even after this pandemic. We see new ed-tech companies entering the space every day, and several of the local existing solutions thriving during these times,” he said.

There is no reason to believe that the sudden progress made will be reversed once – if – the crisis ends.

“As we watch the education and tech spaces continue to merge, we are definitely seeing more innovation, more uptake and more people receptive to the idea of these two worlds colliding. It’s clear that we are moving into a totally contactless, digital era, and watching Africa welcome in this new era is truly a fascinating and phenomenal thing to watch,” Hoernle said.

The lack of funding still hinders the space, however, unlike in health, where major funding has started to flood in. Alfred Opio is CEO of Uganda’s KAINO, which developed a homeschooling app for early childhood development (ECD) in response to the closure of schools in the country as a result of COVID-19. He says funding has not increased at all.

“This is a time of a pandemic, we should see numerous solutions in ed-tech being funded rapidly. This is the time to see many MVPs getting launched, but it’s not the case,” he said.

Lawal agrees.

“Investment is still very slow, due to the speed of return rate, and also the fact that most solutions are dependent on devices and data, and low income levels is still a key factor. User adoption is still a drag in terms of the type of the scale needed to attract big money,” he said.

The numbers confirm this. Even with the doubling of users, the products assembled in the database mentioned at the start of this article had a combined total of just 19 million regular users, compare to the at least 450 million children aged 14 or younger that live on the continent. The vast majority – 17 million – of these “users” were viewers of a TV show produced by Ubongo. Just two products had over one million monthly users – Ubongo and Eneza, an SMS-based interactive learning app. 

Growth, then, remains “slow and steady”.

“The more accessibility and affordability issues are tackled, the better things will get,” Lawal said.

Nivi Sharma, who founded the recently-acquired Kenyan ed-tech eLimu, has the final word. She says the development in the sector is clear, but there is still a long, long way to go.

“As an industry, we have seen some incredible developments in the ed-tech space – the use of AI, machine learning etcetera have helped boost adaptive learning and more personalised learning interventions. But without digital access for all, we need to know that our best efforts and achievements in the ed-tech space will only deepen the inequalities and access to learning opportunities between the haves and the have-nots,” she said.

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Tunisian 3D customer experience startup raises $175k for European expansion https://disrupt-africa.com/2020/11/tunisian-3d-customer-experience-startup-raises-175k-for-european-expansion/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tunisian-3d-customer-experience-startup-raises-175k-for-european-expansion Mon, 23 Nov 2020 09:00:50 +0000 http://disrupt-africa.com/?p=23944 Tunisian startup Onboard, which is transforming customer experience management for hardware with 3D smart manuals, has raised US$175,000 in funding to support its solution development and expansion within the European market. Founded by Safwen Bouali, Cherif Redissi, and Amine Troudi in 2017, Onboard is a SaaS platform solution that enables hardware makers to create best-in-class [...]

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Tunisian startup Onboard, which is transforming customer experience management for hardware with 3D smart manuals, has raised US$175,000 in funding to support its solution development and expansion within the European market.

Founded by Safwen Bouali, Cherif Redissi, and Amine Troudi in 2017, Onboard is a SaaS platform solution that enables hardware makers to create best-in-class support experiences for their customers. 

The startup’s offering effectively replaces paper manuals and call centres, making the experience a one-stop-shop for hardware makers. 

Having previously secured seed funding from Flat6Labs Tunis to develop its technology and build its team, Onboard has now raised US$175,000 from Kepple Africa Ventures and local entrepreneurs Ahmed Hentati and Karim Jouini.

The startup, which launched a private beta in June, is now launching the 1.0 version of its platform, and will use the funding to further develop its product and expand in Europe, primarily France.

“Onboard spearheads a new era of manufacturing and assembly process with its unique approach to transforming the conventional paper manuals into 3D interactive experience. As an institutional investor from Japan, we are very excited to join the journey of Onboard and expand its innovation on a global scale,” said Satoshi Shinada, general partner of Kepple Africa Ventures.

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